EduTech 2015: Super Awesome Sylvia – Maker

Super Awesome Sylvia

Super Awesome Sylvia’s page is *definitely* worth visiting.

Internet sensation Super Awesome Sylvia made an appearance on the main stage! She brought one of her bots with her (a watercolour bot which paints water colour paintings from a scanned image) to show what a young person can do with very little parent/teacher input.

Use of maker ideas (doesn’t have to be electronics) develops a love of learning… for the sake of learning.

Ideas for getting started:

1. Take baby steps – you don’t need to create a fully working robot on your first go. How about something that flashes an LED bulb?

2. Cheap is good. Don’t worry about expensive products. Use off-brand – most of the time it works just as well.

3. Failure happens. You will make mistakes – you will learn from them.

4. Be the student – get along side your kids

5. Don’t sweat the small stuff – just get out there and make something.

Go visit her site and get some making happening.

http://sylviashow.com/

EduTech 2015: IntelEDU – Looks like my school’s done a lot right

Sometimes at these conferences it’s easy to become a bit down… there’s all these cool schools with smart people, doing cool things and producing smart kids. But, what’s really cool is that my school is well on the way to being as cool (if not cooler) than those schools. We’ve been re-imagining assessment and its role in the learner’s life. While we’re not yet 1 to 1 (and we never will be… we’ll be many to 1!), we’re well down the path to a BYOD (or CYOD) environment… we’ve got new wifi infrastructure, we’re going to have NBN soon, and our really smart teachers (that’s all my colleagues) are pushing the boundaries of what a teacher laptop and iPad can do… They’re ready, our students are ready… but is the world ready?

So it’s really nice that the guys from IntelEDU pointed out a heap of things that schools need to do prior to actually rolling out B/CYOD and to ensure good learning. Guess what? We’re doing it or have done it. How awesome is that?

#wearecoct

On being less helpful…

Students Learning

With a bit of trust – students can teach even us. Image from Pixabay – Free images of high quality (http://pixabay.com/en/students-computer-young-boy-99506/)

I love reading this blog, and yet again, I find a gem.

It’s often all too easy to just go ahead and make changes for the kids and pull them along with you, especially when it comes to technology in education. However, every now and then, it’s really apparent that kids can (and do) employ technology in ways we haven’t seen – they’ll find a way of doing stuff that’s easier and more efficient than what we’ve shown them.

We introduce them to a tool and they go ahead and use it ways we didn’t even think of…

Sometimes, we just need to trust.

On being less helpful….

When a ‘real’ teenager is not a real teenager

Social Media There’s been a bit of chat recently about a particular blog post discussing what teenagers really think about social media (A Teenager’s View on Social Media, written by an actual teen), with direct referencing of particular social media platforms. As you might guess, I’m pretty interested in social media and how it can be used to engage our students (let alone keep me up to date with the my social world), so I had a good read of the article.

It is well written, and has some pretty great points, and is written by an actual 19 year old teen. But as I read through the piece, I got a bit uneasy about the assumptions that some of us might then make about teenager use of social media in general, based on the views of this one teenager. Not all of it was matching my experiences of how teens used social media… Am I becoming disconnected from the kids I need to be able to teach? Is there something else going on? And I guess the bigger question could be, just because this is written by one teenager, is it actually representative of all teenagers? To my mind, it isn’t (but then, I’m not a teen, just some old guy who teaches them).

Enter dana boyd (no capitals on purpose), author of It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, a well researched study into the use of social media by teens (and very well worth a read). In this book, she’s researched how teens are using technology in their lives and how that intersects the world around them. In her piece (on Medium), entitled An Old Fogey’s Analysis of a Teenager’s View on Social Media, dana responds to the countless people who sent her the original blog post, with a very well written, thoughtful and helpful article.

Perhaps the biggest take away, if nothing else, is:

“Teens’ use of social media is significantly shaped by race and class, geography and cultural background.”

I found myself wondering how often it was that I placed my assumptions of how my students use technology on the basis of a generalised, westernised, white, middle-class techno-centred group that we’ve all come to assume is the teenager today.

Have a read. It’s food for thought.

View at Medium.com